Week 3 Showstopper: Russian Chrysanthemum Bread

And we’re back! The 2020 Great British Bake Through continues to 2021!

Week 3 (Bread Week) ended with the a bread-themed showstopper challenge. The bakers were instructed to make filled bread centerpieces. The bread should be filled or stuffed, sweet or savory. Judging was based on appearance, design and crust, bake, and flavor.

The Plan

I’ve made bread rolls stuffed with Thanksgiving leftovers before but these were no “centerpiece.” I thought of stromboli, but again I worry about presentation. It took quite a bit of research before I could decide on the best option.

Jordan was the only baker to make sweet bread. This failed and he was sent home, so I’m sticking to savory. I thought about monkey bread, but I’ve usually made that with pre-made dough. While searching I came across chrysanthemum bread (European not Korean). The bread is stuffed and arranged into a flower, perfect for this challenge.

The Bake

  1. The Filling

The recipe I used calls for a “garlic cheese spread.” My first thought was Boursin cheese, but the rules of the game mean that I can’t use store-bought pre-made foods unless indicated in the challenge. I made a copycat Boursin recipe before mixing with the remaining ingredients. Even if you don’t make this bread, you should definitely try this delicious cheese mix!

The addition of the herbs de provence didn’t seem to do much, but I do like the kick from the chili flakes.

2. The Dough

The recipe’s instructions say to mix all of the dough ingredients at once. I prefer to let my yeast bloom first. Is that the word? I like to feed it to ensure a good rise, especially since I’ll need to handle this dough a lot. The yeast sits in the warm (not hot!) milk with some sugar. Once bubbly, I add it to the remainder of the dough ingredients.

There are so many wet ingredients I was surprised it came together so well. I’m still working on how to tell if the dough is kneaded enough…

3. The Rise

It’s winter right now and my house is freezing, so I let it rise in the oven. I was worried it was too warm in the oven that I’d used earlier in the day so I kept the oven door open for a bit. I had some mild panic when steam built up on the inside of the bowl. I was worried if it was too hot, the yeast would die and the dough wouldn’t rise.

I’m not certain this is the amount of rise I need, but it did, in fact, rise.

4. The Assembly

This was the hard part! The dough gets divided, rolled out, cut into small circles, filled, and formed. Whew!

I shifted the petals around quite a bit. At first I packed them too close together. They’d have no room to rise again or grow while baking.

5. The Bake

At first I started baking without brushing the dough. I’m not sure if it was smart, but I pulled it out and brushed it quickly. I’m concerned that I messed up my timer and then it will either bake too much or not enough.

The Final Result

It browned on top quite nicely. I was a bit worried I pulled it out of the oven too soon because underneath was quite light and soft. I do think I went a little overboard with the red chili flake. Next time I may just skip it entirely.

I’m really pleased with how it looks. I haven’t felt this good about a bake since the technical Cherry Cake.

Week 3 Technical: Ciabatta

Although I can’t stand the way Paul Hollywood pronounces “ciabatta” the man knows how to bake bread. For bread week the challenge was to make 4 loaves of ciabatta. Based on Paul’s instructions, this is going to be a very wet dough. I’m going to try very hard not to handle it too much so keeping it from sticking to everything is going to be a challenge.

Also I cannot stand the way that Paul Hollywood pronounces ciabatta.

The Bake

1) The Dough

This dough doesn’t necessarily need to be kneaded, but mixed enough so the water is fully mixed in.

2) Rise

This dough was sticky. The descriptions weren’t kidding. I didn’t have a square tub so I used one of my glass cooking pans. I think I used one that was too big.

3) Shape & Rise Again

Separating the dough was harder than I thought. I cut it but it wouldn’t separate. I ended up handling the dough more than I intended.

The next rise didn’t change the dough much.

4) Bake

I used the whole oven (instead of my half oven). I think this got the bake just right.

The Final Result

The crumb is not bad. It’s light and airy, baked through properly. There’s a nice crust on the outside with a light golden-brown color. The issue is in the shape.

I suspect two issues for the lack of rise to the proper dough shape. Firstly, I used regular yeast instead of instant. I did activate the yeast, but perhaps I should have used warm water and let it cool. The second issue was the container for the first prove. I think if I had used a smaller but taller container, the shape would have been better.

Week 3 Signature: Rye Rolls

Week 3 is for bread, starting with a classic rye roll. In the episode, there was an entire discussion of why rye flour is so difficult to work with, which does worry me a bit. I’ve made some bread. I’m hoping this goes better than biscuit week… Fortunately, instead of 36 I only have to make 12 this time. Again, consistency is key.

The Planning

Some of the bakers used flavors like orange and cardamom, which just doesn’t quite mix well in my head. I’ve only had rye as sandwich bread. I can’t recall ever eating sweet rye, so I looked for some tasty but not too boring rye rolls.

I was surprised how complicated the recipes have been! I figured it wouldn’t be much different from a regular bread roll but there is so much more involved! I ended up choosing a dark pumperknickel bread. I will not be using a breadmaker. That’s cheating. My biggest concern is the bake. The dark color of the bread is going to make it difficult to tell when it’s truly done. I don’t want the crumb to close either, since rye is a tough, strong flour.

The Bake

  1. Batter

The batter was so strange. It looked like I was making chocolate cupcakes, but it smelled so odd with the combination of rye and cocoa and yeast.

2. Knead

My poor Kitchenaid took a beating trying to beat this tough dough. It started to soften slightly but I can’t tell if I over or under-mixed it.

3. Raise

I got a pretty decent rise in the oven. I like to proof my doughs in an oven that was warmed to 175 then turned off.

4. Roll & Raise Again

I tried to weigh out the dough and make things even. The trick with my dinner rolls didn’t seem to work with rye dough.

5. Bake

The dark color made these tricky. I probably should have baked on the middle rack. I lowered the bake time to 25 minutes, but I opened my test roll and there were parts that still seemed underbaked. Another 5 minutes in the oven and well…

The Final Result

This was a complete and total failure. I can’t tell if I over-kneaded the dough and made it too tough, or if I under-kneaded and prevented the gluten from breaking down enough for an elastic dough.

Part of the problem, I think, is that this recipe is for a whole loaf. Rolling these seemed to make layers that prevented the second rise and the rise in the oven. I also suspect that I overbaked them. Some of the layers seemed to stay raw despite 30 minutes in the oven.

As a result these rolls were hard as rocks. I managed to open one. The flavor wasn’t bad. I could taste a bit of the coffee and molasses flavors. The inside was okay, but the outside had a tough crust. Once out of the oven and cooled, they were just solid.

Pumpkin Beer Bread

As a lover of everything pumpkin (which you may have guessed from the pumpkin recipes I continue to make) I bought a case of Leinenkugel’s Pumpkin Ale. Though I enjoyed it, I don’t drink beer very frequently. I found a way to use at least one of the bottles left over.

I had never baked bread when I first made this. All I knew about bread was that they require yeast and some proofing time, or things like “starters.” Fortunately, this is not that kind of bread!

Ingredients

  • 12 oz. pumpkin beer (one bottle)
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 stick butter, melted and divided
  • 3/4 cup canned pumpkin
  • 1 Tbsp molasses
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp ginger
  • 1/8 tsp cloves
  • 1/8 tsp allspice

Instructions

1) Preheat the oven to 350 and lightly grease a 9×5 in. loaf pan.

I usually spray the pan with Pam then use a paper towel to make sure everything is coated and wipe out the excess.

2) Pour the pumpkin beer into a sauce pan and whisk vigorously for 1-2 min. (without heat) for flatten the beer.

3) Heat over medium until boiling, whisking occasionally to help keep the foaming down. Reduce by half (for about 15 min.) and set aside to cool slightly.

Don’t let it cool too much! You’ll want the pumpkin to dissolve.

4) In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.

5) In a smaller bowl (or the pan you used to flatten the beer), whisk together the beer, 2 Tbsp melted butter, canned pumpkin, molasses, and ground spices.

6) Add the pumpkin mixture to the dry ingredients. Mix with a spoon until no dry ingredients are left.

Don’t use a whisk like I did! This is not a batter, it’s a dough. It will get stuck to everything.

7) Pour half of the remaining melted butter into the loaf pan.

8) Put the dough into the pan and drizzle the remaining melted butter over the top.

9) Bake 45-55 min. until a knife can be inserted into the center and come out clean.

Final Thoughts: Isn’t it beautiful? I love the amber color. It was a nice mild flavor with hints of beer, spice, and pumpkin, but none overpoweringly so. If you really want a tasty snack, slather it with apple butter!