Week 4 Showstopper: Baked Alaska

This is the challenge which became the infamous “Bingate.” The bakers were challenged to make a classic ice cream cake called “Baked Alaska”. This retro treat is essentially a cake topped with ice cream and frosted with meringue, which is then set on fire. Now the bakers were baking outside, which makes working with ice cream extremely difficult. While I have the advantage of working inside, working with ice cream can still be a challenge.

I know this whole week is out of order. I am trying to get the pans I need for the technical!

The Plan

I watched the episode to see if the bakers were making their own ice cream. All of the contestants had ice cream makers at their stations. I don’t own one, but I found a no-churn recipe on NY times that I can use. I chose the cinnamon flavor to complement one of my favorite cakes.

I adapted my favorite red wine cupcake recipe for the cake base. I paired this with a cinnamon flavor for the ice cream and a brown sugar meringue.

The Bake

  1. The Cake Base

I’ve made this cake before but only as cupcakes, so I wasn’t certain it would bake properly as a single layer (without over or underbaking). It did crack, but that would all be hidden by the ice cream.

2. The Ice Cream

I swear I will actually invest in an ice cream maker to avoid the drama and destruction associated with making this.

I over-boiled the cream and made a mess all over my stove. I managed to salvage it. It steeped then I strained. I got to use my immersion blender for the first time, which is how a large portion of my ice cream ended up on the walls, and the floors, and my breadbox… and my face. Then I froze it overnight. I know I said I would try to avoid overnight, but this is ice cream from scratch and I was concerned it would melt even faster.

I had a bear of a fight with the ice cream once it was frozen. I got it into the food processor and it exploded at me for a bit. I had to fight the ice cream to blend.

3. Trim & Shape

I removed the ice cream from its pan and into a bowl lined with plastic wrap. Once this was frozen solid I flipped it onto the cake and trimmed the edges for a nice dome.

4. Meringue

I read that meringue can be made with brown sugar, which I had never tried. I bet that the brown sugar would taste better with the deeper flavors (cinnamon, chocolate, wine) than brighter flavors like mint.

I threw out one meringue because I broke an egg yolk in it. I did not have the most luck with this challenge…

5. Bring On the Fire!

I own a rose gold culinary torch (because why not?). I have never had a reason to use it until now. I didn’t burn anything down.

The Final Result

This may have been one of the hardest things to make simply because the ice cream wrecked my kitchen and my soul. But the FLAVOR! Bae said I would be star baker for this. I had to keep myself from eating a big chunk.

My meringue slipped a little, but the swirls were cute. The ice cream as a perfect consistency with a strong but not overwhelming cinnamon flavor. This paired perfectly with my chocolate cake base, which was still moist despite freezing it.

I did battle with Baked Alaska and I won!

Ice Cream Cake & Mighty Moo’s

Ever since we were little, my brother has loved the cotton candy ice cream at Maggie Moo’s (which closed down). His mouth and tongue would be bright blue, made worse by the bubblegum candies he liked to add to his ice cream. I came across a post on Buzzfeed, listing the best ice cream places in each state. Arizona’s is a small ice cream parlor in the West Valley called Mighty Moo’s. Mighty Moo’s makes homemade, hand-churned ice cream, shakes, and floats with unique flavors. The flavors are often changed depending on the season. (I was dying to try their Octoberfest pretzel & beer flavor).

This local place is small with great charm. You can tell it’s a hit with the locals, who wait outside the doors before opening. One sweet older lady said she came every week for her praline ice cream. Buy a cone, a cup, a pint, or other special treats. Next on the list is the “reverse” root-beer float – cream soda with root-beer flavored ice cream! Though it may be a bit of a drive for many, the ice cream is worth it. There’s a greater variety than Phoenix favorites such as Churn.

It turns out Mighty Moo’s carried a flavor called “Elsa,” a bright blue cotton candy flavored ice cream. Naturally, I thought of my brother. It’s a sickeningly sweet flavor for my tastes, but it made a perfect birthday cake for him.

To make an ice cream cake, you do not have to use cotton candy ice cream. Pick a favorite ice cream, hand-churned like Mighty Moo’s or your favorite store bought brand. My only recommendation is to make it the day before hand so that the ice cream can really freeze! (Seriously, save yourself the mess.)

Now the ice cream cake recipe actually has a cake recipe of it’s own, but I have had bad experiences with cakes that involve boiled water, so I chose to use this chocolate cake recipe instead. It’s up to you which recipe you use (or your own!) but my instruction will be for a different chocolate cake recipe.

Ingredients:

For the Cake

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup unsweetened cocoa
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) butter, softened
  • 1cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cup low-fat buttermilk

Filling and Decoration

  • 4 cups ice cream
  • 2 cups chocolate frosting
  • Chocolate sprinkles, for decorating

Instructions:

1) Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease one 10-in. springform pan.

You can line it with parchment paper, but I usually choose to use butter or pam and flour. Since my springform pan is a bit tricky to butter, I used pam. Sprinkle in a few tbsp. of flour and then coat the pan. Turn it sideways and turn it like you would a steering wheel to coat the sides. Shake out the excess flour.

2) In a small bowl, combine flour, cocoa, baking soda, and salt.

3) In large bowl, with mixer at low speed, beat butter and brown and granulated sugars until blended. Increase speed to high; beat 5 minutes or until pale and fluffy, occasionally scraping bowl with rubber spatula.

It’s really important that your ingredients be room temperature. They’ll blend easier, especially butter.

4) Reduce speed to medium-low; add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla until blended. Add flour mixture alternately with buttermilk, beginning and ending with flour mixture; beat just until batter is smooth, occasionally scraping bowl with rubber spatula.

5) Spoon batter into pan. Bake 30-40 min. or until toothpick inserted in center of cake comes out clean. 

I’m not as clear as the baking time because I tried the original bake time, forgetting that a 10 in. pan takes longer to cook than a few 8 in. pans. Put it in for 30 min. and keep an eye on it.

6) Let the cake cool for 10 min. Once cool enough to handle, take the cake out and let it cool on wire racks.

7) Once cool, cut the cake into two halves. Wrap the layers in plastic wrap and freeze for at least 2 hours.

8) Place one layer of frozen cake into the (clean) springform pan.

Here’s where it gets messy!! I made such a mess that I’ve made some suggestions on how to make it easier.

9) Remove your ice cream from the freezer. Thaw for about 10 min. Once softer, spread the ice cream on top of the cake layer in the springform pan.

It may not take very long to melt the ice cream. Since I live in Arizona and this was hand-churned, the ice cream melted quickly. I might consider melting the ice cream completely for a more smooth surface.

10) Place the other cake layer over the top of the ice cream. Place the plastic wrap over the top to seal. Freeze again for at least 2 hours.

Two hours was not enough to keep everything from melting and falling apart. I would suggest freezing overnight.

12. Remove the cake from the pan and frost fast! Otherwise your ice cream will melt.

13. Decorate as desired and then wrap with plastic wrap. Use toothpicks to keep it from touching the frosting if you want.

14. Remove from the freezer about 10-15 min. before serving to thaw a little.

Final Thoughts: In hindsight, hand-churned ice cream may not have been a good choice, but my little brother was happy with it. If I ever do this again, I’ve got some strategies to make the ice cream part less frantic and messy. Even though I disliked the ice cream by itself, in the cake it was super delicious!

If you’d like, stop in at Mighty Moo for a tasty treat!